Battle Of New Orleans

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Lyrics

Well, in eighteen and fourteen we took a little trip
along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip.
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans,
And we caught the bloody British near the town of New Orleans.

We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Well, I see'd Mars Jackson walkin down the street
talkin' to a pirate by the name of Jean Lafayette [pronounced La-feet]
He gave Jean a drink that he brung from Tennessee
and the pirate said he'd help us drive the British in the sea.

The French said Andrew, you'd better run,
for Packingham's a comin' with a bullet in his gun.
Old Hickory said he didn't give a dang,
he's gonna whip the britches off of Colonel Packingham.

We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Well, we looked down the river and we see'd the British come,
and there must have been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drum.
They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring
while we stood by our cotton bales and didn't say a thing.

Old Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
if we didn't fire a musket til we looked 'em in the eyes.
We held our fire til we see'd their faces well,
then we opened up with squirrel guns and really gave a yell.

We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Well, we fired our cannon til the barrel melted down,
so we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round.
We filled his head with cannon balls and powdered his behind,
and when they tetched the powder off, the gator lost his mind.

We'll march back home but we'll never be content
till we make Old Hickory the people's President.
And every time we think about the bacon and the beans,
we'll think about the fun we had way down in New Orleans.

We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin,
But there wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Well, they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go.
They ran so fast the hounds couldn't catch 'em
down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
But there wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

This song was originally posted at:
http://bussongs.com/songs/battle-of-new-orleans.php

Information About Battle Of New Orleans

Jimmie Driftwood a school principle from Arkansas wrote the song "The Battle Of New Orleans" as a way to inspire his students. Driftwood went on to write more historically based songs and was eventually given a recording contract in 1959.

This song attempts to capture the 1815 Battle of New Orleans wherein the central character is an American fighting alongside Andrew Jackson against British forces. The song's melody was inspired by the famous American fiddle tune "The 8th of January"; the date of the Battle of New Orleans.

The Marquis de Lafayette (pronounced "La-fey-ETTE) was a French nobleman who assisted the colonies in the Revolutionary War. Jean Lafitte (pronounced La-FEET) was a different person - a pirate who assisted General Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans.

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2 Comments

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Michael/mehman22, United States

20 February 2011 at 12:02am

I loved that you can download it fast and easy!

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Jesstina, Usa

28 March 2009 at 5:29pm

when does the words start with the music

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This song has been printed from the BusSongs.com website.