Summer - Far And Far To Zanzibar

31 Comments

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bettyanne, albuquerque

3 May 2014 at 6:38pm

this song and others were from the Music Everywhere/Birchard & Co song textbook for 6th grade public school music radio program during the 50's.

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Ken, United States

1 March 2014 at 7:25am

2nd grade .. Culver City Grammar School. The two songs we most loved singing in that class were "Far and Far to Zanzibar" (the downright murkish version) and "There were three crows that sat in a tree, Billy, McGee, McGaw". That was in 1945 not long after the war ended.

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Earl, United States

6 February 2013 at 11:17pm

One of my favorites more than 60 years ago. I think I remember the second verse pretty well and can get much of the first without too many errors. The second verse follows: I went to Spain, this time by train, the couuds were high but it looked like rain and the sky was downright murkish. And the guard would stare when I asked the fare, and I think he spoke in Turkish. Or it might be Erse or the Choctaw tongue as he said in verse or perhaps was sung in a sing-song rise and fall, "pick a peck of polywogs a pocket full of smoke" singing rinky dinky davie for a train mans joke, "for you'll get far wetter where the drive wheels run", singing rinky dinky doodle, now my song is done.

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Annie, United States

5 February 2013 at 10:03pm

I remember this song also...."I went to sea in an open car, and the sea was downright murkish. And the guard at the gate he said I was late and I think he spoke in Turkish"...etc. "...pocket full of sand, singing Rinky Dinky Davey in a rain-wet land, And the seas roll wetter than the dry lands are..." Obviously variations and many verses. What fun for us all to remember this together! =o)

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Paul, United States

8 January 2013 at 12:41am

I can't account for my thinking of this song today. I recently passed my 70th birthday, and like others who wrote I learned it in the 4th or 5th grade or maybe 6th. My memory of the 1st couplet is much as what others wrote: O far and far to Zanzibar I went to sea in a open car I remember something rhyming with Turkish: ... and I think he spoke in Turkish, or it might have been Erse or the Choctaw tongue and he said in verse or perhaps 'twas sung in a sing song sort of way Pick a peck of polliwogs, a pocket full of salt, Sing rinky dinky dooley and it not our fault If the seas are wetter than the dry lands are, Singing rinky dinky dooley down to Zanzibar. It was in El Dorado Elementary School's song book. Miss Taverna was the music teacher, and also my home room teacher for 5th and 6th grade. This song was a favorite of out class, along with Fooba Wooba John and Zum Gali Gali.

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Ebony, Australia

28 November 2012 at 2:48am

I have used this for my Diploma resource files as i have chosen the theme of "going on holidays" on of the best songs i have found!

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Bud, United States

2 August 2012 at 12:04am

I remember some of this but can't remember a song from yesterday. How's that? Anyway, from about 70 years ago I remember: Pick a peck of polywogs, a pocket full of sand. Singing rinky dinky doodle in a rain wet land, For the rain gets wetter where the dry lands are, Singing rinky dinky doodle down to Zanzibar. I'm sure that there is lots more to it and also different variations but that's my recall. I just started humming it today for no reason that I can think of. So, I thought that I'd google this and see what others had to say. Thanks for all the comments.

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Ted, United States

14 May 2012 at 3:31pm

Sang this in 3rd/4th grade in Los Angeles, about 1944. Right after Penmanship, Music. Books come out, teqacher asks for requests, hands go up, request is made, teacher blows on pitch-pipe, away we go. Good times

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Michael, United States

10 March 2012 at 11:09pm

I still remember the illustration of a guy on a convertible Model A, in the ocean and the fish winking at him! from my third grade songbook. Here's what I remember: O far and far, to Zanzibar, I went to sea in an open car and I found it rather boring, for the rain did rain and the snow did snow and the deep seas kept on roaring. And the fish would grin as they passed me by with a waving fin and a fishy eye, and they said as I recall: Pick a peck of pollywog, a pocket full of sand, singing rinky dinky Davey it's a wave wet land, O the seas roll wetter than the dry lands be, singin' Rinky Dinky Davey down the deep salt sea!--and that's all I remember

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Ellen, United States

12 February 2012 at 3:18am

Profound thanks to all of you! I'm 71 years old, and we sang this song in 6th grade in James Bowie Junior High School in Beaumont, Texas). It's haunted me ever since. All of you have filled in the gaps in my memory, and now I can sing it to my grandchildren.

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Jon, United States

14 December 2011 at 8:25pm

Deerfield Grammar School, Deerfield, Illinois in the late 40's, I recall these words: Far and far to Zanzabar, I went to sea in an open car but I found it rather breezy.

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Charlene Steinmetz, United States

19 October 2011 at 4:41am

SOme more from memory: I went again by railroad train the clouds were high and it looked like rain and the sky was downright murkish and the guard would stare when i asked the fare and i think he spoke in Turkish or it might be Urse or the Chocktaw tongue when he said in verse or perhaps 'twas sung in a sing song rise and fall... WHY can't we find the lyrics to this song?

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Tonja, United States

4 August 2011 at 4:40am

We sang it the way that Brenda, Arkansas, remembers it with one exception. "If the waves roll wetter than the dry lands are...". I learned this in 5th or 6th grade music class in Dallas, Texas in 1959-1960. God bless all contributors! This is too great a song to lose.

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Brenda, Arkansas, United States

25 February 2011 at 8:21pm

And the fish would grin as they passed me by With a waving fin and a fishy eye And they said, as I recall: Pick a peck of polly-wogs A pocket full of salt Singin Rinky dinky Davey And it's not our fault If the waves are all wetter Than the dry lands are. Sining rinky dinky Davey Down to Zanzibar. This is how I remember the rest. We used to sing it a lot in Music class in Parkin, Arkansas Our music teacher was Mrs Ruth Hinkley

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Keerthana, India

22 January 2011 at 12:57pm

awesome

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Nancy, United States

26 November 2010 at 4:45pm

My Mum taught this song to me when I was little. I am 40 years old now. I only ever knew the first verse. Her big sister taught it to her when she was in grade four. That big sister is now 67 years old. I would love to learn the whole thing. Thank you for posting so many lines that I never knew! I hope someone's memory is jogged and we find out what that captain said in Turkish. *Please Deepthi, tell us all the lyrics that you remember.

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Jim, United States

1 November 2010 at 8:31pm

My memory goes: "On the way to Zanzibar, I went to sea in an open car - - - - - - - "I went again by railroad train, The clouds were high but it looked like rain, And the sky was downright murkish - - - - - - And I think he spoke in Turkish - - - - - -."

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Deepthi, Chennai, India

20 July 2010 at 10:59am

I'm 23 now and I remember singing this song as a part of the medley for our Founders' Day when I was in the 9th grade :) I still remember the whole song... :)

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Jim, San Francisco

4 June 2010 at 5:31pm

I'm amazed that so many people remember this song! I learned it in LA. I think it was in a songbook we used. I too would love to get all the lyrics. Thanks to all of you for your contributions!

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Jim, San Francisco

4 June 2010 at 6:43am

I can't believe that so many others remember this song! I too probably learned it in the 4th or 5th grade. As I recall, it appeared in a green songbook that was used at the time. I too would like to have the complete lyrics.

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This song has been printed from the BusSongs.com website.